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WordPress Tutorial

In this WordPress tutorial, you will find everything you need in order to create a website with WordPress. From installation to backups – we have it all covered.

Be sure to check out the list of our newest WordPress tutorials at the very bottom of this page.

WordPress first saw the light of day on May 27, 2003. The founders are Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little.

WordPress can be referred to as an online, open source site building tool based on PHP and MySQL programming languages. In more advanced terms it is called a content management system (CMS).

When WordPress was first launched it had several users but over time grew into the biggest and most popular CMS in the world. Today, WordPress is powering over 75 million websites.

Research carried out in 2020 shows that this content management system is used by more than 26% of the 10 million best-ranking sites.

 

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Video Tutorial

 

Why is WordPress so popular?

After finding out the massive number of users WordPress has, it may leave you wondering, why is it so popular?

A mixture of several factors should be taken into account. The general viewpoint is that WordPress is a simple blogging tool, however, it is much more than that.

Due to the fact that WordPress is free and an open source project, it allows anyone to improve and edit its code according to one’s liking. It also features thousands of free plugins, themes, widgets, and other tools.

All these features allow you to create any type of website, starting from simple blogs, personal websites or portfolios, ranging to e-shops, knowledge bases or job boards.

Another factor is that WordPress is completely free and supports all hosting platforms with PHP and MySQL. On top of that, this CMS is constantly updated with new versions that improve security, include new features and improve overall performance.

Last, but not least, WordPress has a huge community with dedicated forums and discussions all over the internet. The amount of data that is available and thousands of WordPress tutorials also make WordPress one of the easiest to use content management systems out there.

What is a CMS?

A content management system or CMS for short is an application with the ability to create, modify and publish digital content. In most cases, it also supports multiple users, allowing them to work in collaboration.

For example, in WordPress it is possible to create several administrative users, each one having different privileges. Content management systems also include text and formatting features, the ability to upload videos, photos, audio, maps or even your own code.

A content management system consists of two major components:

  • A content management application (CMA). The CMA can be referred to as the graphical user interface (GUI) that lets a user create, modify, remove and publish content without ever needing to have knowledge of HTML or programming languages.
  • A content delivery application (CDA). The CDA is responsible for the back-end services that manage and deliver content after it is in the CMA.

Other features worth mentioning are:

  • SEO-friendly URLs
  • Online support and communities
  • User/group functions
  • Various templates and designs
  • Installation wizards and upgrades/updates

The three most popular content management systems in the world are WordPress, Joomla, and Drupal.

WordPress.com vs. WordPress.org

WordPress.com and WordPress.org are two ways of hosting a WordPress site.

The thing that varies with these two methods is the actual host. By using WordPress.org, you may download the script free of charge and host it yourself on a local machine or with a hosting provider (such as Hostinger).

On the other hand, WordPress.com takes care of all that by hosting the site for you. You don’t have to manage a web server, pay for hosting or download software, however, ads are shown on your site.

Both WordPress.org and WordPress.com have certain pros and cons.

If you are not interested in having your own hosting or managing a web server, then WordPress.com may be the way to go.

It is free and can be quickly set up. You will also have various features and options for your site’s customization.

However, it comes with downsides. Your website will include WordPress.com in the URL and you will not be able to upload custom themes or plugins.

The ability to edit or modify PHP code behind your site will also not be possible.

Using a self-hosted version from WordPress.org provides more flexibility and control over your site. You will be able to use your own domain name, upload themes, plugins and install them.

You will also have access to your WordPress files, database, and code, meaning that you will be able to modify it according to your liking. The most popular and powerful WordPress sites are self-hosted, as it provides greater flexibility and the ability to implement custom functionality, code, and designs.

Last but not least, in case WordPress is not the CMS for you, having your own hosting account will allow you to test other content management systems such as Drupal or Joomla.

This WordPress tutorial will focus on the self-hosted WordPress version.

Step 1 – Installing WordPress

One reason for WordPress popularity is the low system requirements needed to run this CMS on a web server:

  • PHP version 5.2.4 or greater.
  • MySQL version 5.0.15 or greater or any version of MariaDB.

You would probably have to search for a hosting provider which lacks WordPress support. Many hosts use various auto-installers to make the WordPress installation process as simple as possible.

By using auto-installers, users no longer have to deal with database creation or file uploading.

In this part of our WordPress tutorial, you will learn two different ways to install WordPress.

Before proceeding with WordPress installation, you need to decide on how you want to access your website. Do you want WordPress on your domain name root (example.com), subfolder (example.com/blog) or subdomain name (blog.example.com)? Only if you want to setup WordPress on a subdomain name, you will have to take an additional step and create a subdomain name. On Hostinger this can be easily done in the Subdomains section.

Option 1.1 – Installing WordPress on Hostinger by Using Auto Installer

Let’s start with the simplest and fastest way to install WordPress – Hostinger auto installer. The steps below show how to install WordPress on Hostinger control panel:

  1. Access Hostinger control panel.
  2. Locate Auto Installer and open it.
  3. Enter WordPress in the search field and click on its icon.
  4. Now fill in website details:
  • URL – The URL where WordPress should be installed. If you want to install it on root domain name (example.com) then leave it empty.
  • Language – Choose WordPress language.
  • Administrator Username – Your WordPress admin username. You will use it to access WordPress admin area.
  • Administrator Password – Your WordPress admin password. You will use it to access WordPress admin area.
  • Administrator Email – Enter your email address.
  • Website Title – The title of your WordPress website.
  • Website Tagline – A short sentence or slogan explaining what your website is about.
  1. Press Install button.

 

Option 1.2 – Installing WordPress Manually

If you want to understand the basics and learn how WordPress works, you can install it manually. WordPress is famous for its 5-minute installer.

The process is straightforward and similar to any other software installation. So if you have ever installed any computer program – it won’t be hard for you to complete the WordPress installation.

What you need before proceeding:

  • FTP client or File Manager
  • Latest Version of WordPress

First of all, download the latest WordPress from the official WordPress.org website.

WordPress Download Button

Once the download is complete, you can start uploading WordPress files to your hosting account. You can use either a File Manager provided by your hosting provider, or an FTP client.

There is no difference which tool you will use to upload WordPress files, besides ease-of-use. The only thing that you should take into account is the destination directory.

For example, if you want to have WordPress on a root domain name, files should be uploaded to the public_html folder; if you want to serve WordPress from a subdomain name or a subfolder, upload the files to the appropriate directory.